Fung Forum 2015: Modern Plagues
Nov. 2-3 | Dublin, Ireland

FungThis year's forum on global health focused on the current Ebola crisis as a critical case study of a modern plague. Resolving the Ebola crisis requires a multidisciplinary approach involving not only public health and medical knowledge but an understanding of its economic, environmental, political and historical roots and consequences. This conference brought together all of these perspectives in the hopes of identifying methods for avoiding future crises. Several keynote speakers helped to frame the current crisis, and the panels used the Ebola crisis as a framing mechanism to examine aspects of modern plagues more generally. Speakers came from academia, the government and non-governmental sectors as well as the media. Watch the videos.

 

News and Commentary


by B. Rose Huber
The weaknesses of the global response to Ebola in West Africa from 2013 to 2016 not only cost tens of thousands of lives; it also hurt the credibility and confidence of the global health community. So it was encouraging that universities, think-tanks, the World Health Organization and other institutions took time to explore what went wrong and how we can all do better.
by B. Rose Huber, Woodrow Wilson School
As world leaders grapple with containing the Zika virus, the Ebola epidemic in West Africa provides valuable lessons for how to respond to other in
by Isabella (Mizzi) Gomes ‘16, Woodrow Wilson School
More than 150 people gathered in Robertson Hall in early October for a panel discussion and reception by four social scientists who examined challe
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by B. Rose Huber, Woodrow Wilson School
On the verdant campus of University College Dublin, nearly 300 public health experts and practitioners, government officials, scholars and students
by B. Rose Huber, Woodrow Wilson School
An essay by panelist Cormac O'Grada, professor at University College Dublin, reviews Ebola and plague, which share several characteristics but are quite different in terms of mortality.
by B. Rose Huber, Woodrow Wilson School
ICYMI: Princeton alumnus and forum panelist Doug Mercado discussed his work with USAID during a live Twitter chat.
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