Fung Forum 2015: Modern Plagues
Nov. 2-3 | Dublin, Ireland

FungThis year's forum on global health will focus on the current Ebola crisis as a critical case study of a modern plague. Resolving the Ebola crisis requires a multidisciplinary approach involving not only public health and medical knowledge but an understanding of its economic, environmental, political and historical roots and consequences.

This conference will bring together all of these perspectives in the hopes of identifying methods for avoiding future crises. Several keynote speakers will help to frame the current crisis, and the panels will use the Ebola crisis as a framing mechanism to examine aspects of modern plagues more generally. Speakers come from academia, the government and non-governmental sectors as well as the media.

This event, held Nov. 2-3, 2015, in Dublin, Ireland, is open to the public. Register here

Download Agenda

 

News and Commentary


by B. Rose Huber, Woodrow Wilson School
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Pam Belluck will participate in a live Twitter chat on Wednesday, July 29, at noon EDT. To join the conversation, tweet @PamBelluck questions about her real-time coverage of the Ebola crisis using the hashtag #FungForum.
by B. Rose Huber, Woodrow Wilson School
Since mid-May, Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) has infected 150 and killed 16 people in South Korea. Now, after months of quarantine, hundreds in the region are being released. We discussed the threat of MERS with Laura Kahn, a research scholar at the Program on Science and Global Security at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.
by B. Rose Huber, Woodrow Wilson School
Carolyn Rouse, a professor of anthropology at Princeton University, and Kimberly Bonner '08, MPP '12, participated in a live video chat on Wednesday, June 10, to discuss Ebola relief efforts.
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by B. Rose Huber, Woodrow Wilson School
A new Princeton University study shows that children may in fact live in the immunological shadow of measles for up to three years, leaving them highly susceptible to a host of other deadly diseases.
by B. Rose Huber, Woodrow Wilson School
A team of journalists from The New York Times – including Fung Forum moderators Pam Belluck '85 and Sheri Fink – won the Pulitzer Prize in Journalism for its reporting on the Ebola crisis in West Africa.
by Office of Communications
Raphael Frankfurter, a 2013 Princeton graduate and executive director of the nonprofit group Wellbody Alliance, participated in a live video chat Thursday, May 7, to discuss the group's response to Ebola in Sierra Leone and the lessons learned from the outbreak.
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