• First detected in 1976, the Ebola outbreak is ongoing with a reported 14,134 cases and 9,541 deaths.
  • The 1918 flu pandemic was one of the first two pandemics involving the H1N1 influenza virus. Between 1918 and 1920, it infected 500 million people across the world, killing between 50 and 100 million people -- three to five percent of the world's population at the time.
  • The Great Famine (commonly referred to as the "Potato Famine") was a period of mass starvation, disease and emigration in Ireland, which resulted in 1 million deaths between 1845 and 1852.
  • Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a viral respiratory disease which resulted in 8,096 cases 774 deaths between 2002 and 2003.  
  • The Black Death (commonly referred to as the "Black Plague") was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, peaking between 1346 and 1353 and resulting in an estimated 75 to 200 million deaths. 
  • Since the beginning of the epidemic in 1983, 78 million people have been infected with the HIV/AIDs virus, and about 39 million people have died from the virus. 

Fung Forum 2015: Modern Plagues

This year's forum on global health will focus on the current Ebola crisis as a critical case study of a modern plague. Resolving the Ebola crisis requires a multidisciplinary approach involving not only public health and medical knowledge but an understanding of its economic, environmental, political and historical roots and consequences.

This conference will bring together all of these perspectives in the hopes of identifying methods for avoiding future crises. Several keynote speakers will help to frame the current crisis, and the panels will use the Ebola crisis as a framing mechanism to examine aspects of modern plagues more generally. Speakers come from academia, the government and non-governmental sectors as well as the media.

This event is open to the public; registration is required. For a reminder to register, sign up here

Download Agenda

 

Blog


Posted: Wednesday, February 25, 2015 - 4:00pm
by B. Rose Huber, Woodrow Wilson School
Sub-Saharan Africans rate their own wellbeing, their health and their health-care systems among the lowest in the world, according to a new report published by Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Despite these low ratings, health care is not a primary policy concern for people in these countries. Instead, sub-Saharan Africans cite jobs as a top priority, followed by improving agriculture and tackling corruption.
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Posted: Wednesday, February 25, 2015 - 11:02am
by Michael Hotchkiss, Office of Communications
The third annual Princeton-Fung Global Forum will bring together researchers, scholars, policymakers and health officials in November to examine West Africa's Ebola outbreak as a case study of a modern plague. The event, to be held Nov. 2-3 in Dublin, Ireland, will highlight the multidisciplinary approach needed to resolve the crisis, involving not only public health and medical knowledge but an understanding of its economic, environmental, political and historical roots and consequences. The conference, "Modern Plagues: Lessons Learned From the Ebola Crisis," will also look ahead to ways to avoid and address future crises.
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